The dosage on the back label said to give him 1/2 to a full dropper twice a day due to his weight. I gave him 1/2 a dropper with his food. A few hours later I noticed he was wobbling when he walked and tripped up the stairs and collapsed. I took him to my vet and he said there must be THC in the oil. I thought, how can a company sell this product knowing full well that THC is extremely TOXIC for animals! The rep I bought the vials from said I gave him too much and to follow the dosage chart she gave me. Why would I give him anymore of this poison to my dog? Also, why did the product sold to me not have the proper dosage label? Also, I found that this product is Full Spectrum which means there is THC in the product.
Finding cultivars suited to local conditions is a key to success. Hemp prefers warm growing conditions, and the best European fiber strains are photoperiodically adapted to flowering in southern Europe, which provides seasons of at least 4 months for fiber, and 5.5 months for seed production. Asian land races are similarly adapted to long seasons. In Canada, many of the available cultivars flower too late in the season for fiber production, and the same may be predicted for the northern US. Fiber production should also be governed by availability of moisture throughout the season, and the need for high humidity in the late summer and fall for retting, so that large areas of the interior and west of North America are not adapted to growing fiber hemp. The US Corn Belt has traditionally been considered to be best for fiber hemp. There are very few cultivars dedicated to oilseed production (such as ‘Finola’ and ‘Anka’) or that at least are known to produce good oilseed crops (such as ‘Fasamo’ and ‘Uniko-B’). Oilseed production was a specialty of the USSR, and there is some likelihood that northern regions of North America may find short-season, short-stature oilseed cultivars ideal.
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Cannabidiol Oil, or CBD as it’s more commonly known, has recently moved to the forefront in the medical cannabis diaspora. It’s a rising star, boasting wide-ranging health benefits.Cannabidiol CBD is one of at least 85 known cannabinoids. These are compounds found in the cannabis plant. Unlike its infamous cousin THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol), however, CBD has no psychoactive properties whatsoever.
Lisa Hamilton, a jeweler and doula in Brooklyn, NY, knows about the side effects. She recently tried CBD for the shoulder pain that plagued her five years after an accident. Her doctor certified that she was in chronic pain, which under New York State law allowed her to buy from a state dispensary. One Friday, she swallowed two 10-mg capsules, the amount recommended at the dispensary, then took another two on Saturday. “By Sunday, it felt like I’d gotten hit by a truck. Every muscle and joint ached,” Hamilton says. She cut back to one pill a day the following week, but still felt hungover. She stopped after that.
You can Diane, but more is not better. It is best to start out slow using the 500 mg unless you have a serious chronic illness. It has been found that you must find your "sweet spot" and everyone is different. If you use too much for you, your symptoms can return. Most people I know have found that their sweet spot is 5 to 10 drops twice a day. The bottle contains 1000 drops so, at the amounts above, the bottle will last 2-3 months.
In addition to safety risks, many jobs also present risks of disease, illness and other long-term health problems. Among the most common occupational diseases are various forms of pneumoconiosis, including silicosis and coal worker's pneumoconiosis (black lung disease). Asthma is another respiratory illness that many workers are vulnerable to. Workers may also be vulnerable to skin diseases, including eczema, dermatitis, urticaria, sunburn, and skin cancer.[61][62] Other occupational diseases of concern include carpal tunnel syndrome and lead poisoning.
Aqua, Allantoin, Aloe Barbadensis (Aloe Vera) Leaf, Glycerin, Xanthan Gum, Cetearyl Glucoside, Glyceryl Stearate SE, Cetyl Alcohol, Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Oil, Polea Europea (Olive) Fruit Oil, Caprylic Capric Triglyceride, Cannabis Sativa (Hemp Seed Oil), Theobroma Cacao (Cocoa) Seed Butter, Butyrospermum Parkii, Stearyl Alcohol, Sodium Hyaluronate, Camellia Sinensis (Green Tea) Leaf Extract, Gluconolactone, Sodium Benzoate, Calcium Gluconate, Pyrus Malus (Apple) Fruit Extract, Phytocelltec Malus Domestica

^ McLaren JA, Silins E, Hutchinson D, Mattick RP, Hall W (January 2010). "Assessing evidence for a causal link between cannabis and psychosis: a review of cohort studies". The International Journal on Drug Policy. 21 (1): 10–9. doi:10.1016/j.drugpo.2009.09.001. PMID 19783132. The contentious issue of whether cannabis use can cause serious psychotic disorders that would not otherwise have occurred cannot be answered based on the existing data
Thermal Insulation. Thermal insulation products (Fig. 20, 21) are the third most important sector of the hemp industry of the EU. These are in very high demand because of the alarmingly high costs of heating fuels, ecological concerns about conservation of non-renewable resources, and political-strategic concerns about dependence on current sources of oil. This is a market that is growing very fast, and hemp insulation products are increasing in popularity. In Europe, it has been predicted that tens of thousands of tonnes will be sold by 2005, shared between hemp and flax (Karus et al. 2000).
In addition to safety risks, many jobs also present risks of disease, illness and other long-term health problems. Among the most common occupational diseases are various forms of pneumoconiosis, including silicosis and coal worker's pneumoconiosis (black lung disease). Asthma is another respiratory illness that many workers are vulnerable to. Workers may also be vulnerable to skin diseases, including eczema, dermatitis, urticaria, sunburn, and skin cancer.[61][62] Other occupational diseases of concern include carpal tunnel syndrome and lead poisoning.

Cannabis

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