The genus Cannabis was formerly placed in the nettle (Urticaceae) or mulberry (Moraceae) family, and later, along with the genus Humulus (hops), in a separate family, the hemp family (Cannabaceae sensu stricto).[45] Recent phylogenetic studies based on cpDNA restriction site analysis and gene sequencing strongly suggest that the Cannabaceae sensu stricto arose from within the former family Celtidaceae, and that the two families should be merged to form a single monophyletic family, the Cannabaceae sensu lato.[46][47]

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For home cooks like me, I recommend CBD extra virgin olive oil because of its versatility. You can drizzle it on everything from salads to pizza and even brambleberry ice cream. I even make a miso-honey glaze while using a little bit of the stuff. In particular, I’m a big fan of Pot d’Huile, which was founded by San Francisco-based Yannick Crespo. It’s stellar. For one thing, it tastes exactly the way good EVOO should—with none of that “green” marijuana aftertaste. It also doesn’t remind me of Bertolli—not that there’s anything wrong with it. But you know, delicious EVOO is nothing like Bertolli. Crespo attributes Pot d’Huile’s non-compromising flavor with the ethanol extraction process that the company uses, which is slightly more expensive—in addition to using locally-sourced oil from Northern California. The flavor is so good that Pot d'Huile regularly hosts pop-up dinners with chefs who are so into it. (And if you ever find yourself in a city where they’re hosting, it’d be a shame to skip out.) But beyond all that, Pot d’Huile makes dosing easy: It’s 1mg of CBD per 1ml of olive oil. So all you’ll really need to incorporate CBD EVOO into your meals are measuring spoons. And yes, they do have THC olive oils as well—at $50 for 100ml. In the future, the company also has plans on creating a THC–CBD oil. Easy peasy.
The shape and type of a CBD almost always closely reflect the city's history. Cities with strong preservation laws and maximum building height restrictions to retain the character of the historic and cultural core will have a CBD quite a distance from the centre of the city. This is quite common for European cities such as Paris or Vienna. In cities in the New World that grew quickly after the invention of mechanised modes such as road or rail transport, a single central area or downtown will often contain most of the region's tallest buildings and act both as the CBD and the commercial and cultural city center. Increasing urbanisation in the 21st century have developed megacities, particularly in Asia, that will often have multiple CBDs scattered across the urban area. It has been said that downtowns (as understood in North America) are therefore conceptually distinct from both CBDs and city centers.[1] No two CBDs look alike in terms of their spatial shape, however certain geometric patterns in these areas are recurring throughout many cities due to the nature of centralised commercial and industrial activities.[2]
“CBD is extremely anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective. A normal person may use it to prevent conditions such as arthritis or even topically to prevent acne breakouts,” Dr. Shivani Amin, a physician and cannabis expert who is a member of the AMMPA (American Medical Marijuana Physicians Association), says. “I think CBD shows great promise for the future. It all boils down to educating the public about the correct usage and understanding the plant better.”
Understanding CBD’s analgesic, or pain-relieving, interactions with the ECS can shed light on CBD’s other interactions and effects. Importantly, the ECS participates in our bodies’ pain processing, but when CBD is introduced to our ECS, it stops the body from absorbing a pain-regulating compound known as anandamide — one of our body’s’ own natural cannabinoid molecules. Inhibiting the absorption of this compound shunts excess quantities into the bloodstream that in turn reduces pain. One study has revealed that CBD targets alpha-3 (α3) glycine receptors to suppress chronic pain and inflammation associated with dysfunctional glycine receptors, which are an important target for pain processing in the spine. In both humans and animal models, CBD has been shown to have a variety of anti-inflammatory properties.
Molecular analytical techniques developed in the late 20th century are being applied to questions of taxonomic classification. This has resulted in many reclassifications based on evolutionary systematics. Several studies of Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and other types of genetic markers have been conducted on drug and fiber strains of Cannabis, primarily for plant breeding and forensic purposes.[74][75][25][76][77] Dutch Cannabis researcher E.P.M. de Meijer and coworkers described some of their RAPD studies as showing an "extremely high" degree of genetic polymorphism between and within populations, suggesting a high degree of potential variation for selection, even in heavily selected hemp cultivars.[37] They also commented that these analyses confirm the continuity of the Cannabis gene pool throughout the studied accessions, and provide further confirmation that the genus consists of a single species, although theirs was not a systematic study per se.

Cannabinoids are a class of compounds that interact with receptors throughout your body. CBD is just one of dozens of cannabinoids found in cannabis, including tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the one responsible for marijuana’s famous high. Medical cannabis is technically any cannabis product used for medicinal purposes, and these can contain THC or CBD or both, said Nick Jikomes, a neuroscientist at Leafly, a website that provides information about legal cannabis. “A common mistake people make is to think that CBD is ‘the medical cannabinoid’ and THC is ‘the recreational cannabinoid.’” That’s inaccurate, he said, because THC is a potent anti-inflammatory and can be helpful for pain.

Cannabidiol and cannabidiolic acid work by binding to various receptor targets throughout the central nervous system and the rest of the body.  Acting at these receptor sites, it exerts influence on the metabolism of various neurotransmitter systems.  It seems like ‘snake oil’ that one compound can have all the beneficial effects listed above; however, cannabinoid receptors exist throughout the nervous system and it is known that such a ubiquitous receptor must be involved in nearly everything the nervous system does, just like serotonin and dopamine receptors.  Dopamine affects pleasure, but also pain.  Anxiety and also relaxation.  Heart contraction and blood pressure.  All of these systems are integrated so cannabinoid receptors will indeed have effects on all of these systems and exogenous cannabinoids from plants can definitely have therapeutic effects which are extensive.

Whether you're a natural chef or just looking for a different way to get your daily CBD dose, incorporating CBD oil into your kitchen pantry can totally change the way you think about healthy eating. Today, we're taking a look at some mouth-watering CBD cooking recipes as well as a few general tips that will make CBD a permanent part of your ingredient list! Link in bio!https://cbdfx.com/cbd-news/8-tasty-cbd-oil-recipes-to-spice-up-your-day/
CBD has proven neuroprotective effects and its anti-cancer properties are being investigated at several academic research centers in the United States and elsewhere. A 2010 brain cancer study by California scientists found that CBD “enhances the inhibitory effects of THC on human glioblastoma cell proliferation and survival.” This means that CBD makes THC even more potent as an anticancer substance. Also in 2010, German researchers reported that CBD stimulates neurogenesis, the growth of new brain cells, in adult mammals.
In 2019, the European Commission announced that CBD and other cannabinoids would be classified as "novel foods",[85] meaning that CBD products would require authorization under the EU Novel Food Regulation stating: because "this product was not used as a food or food ingredient before 15 May 1997, before it may be placed on the market in the EU as a food or food ingredient, a safety assessment under the Novel Food Regulation is required."[86] The recommendation – applying to CBD extracts, synthesized CBD, and all CBD products, including CBD oil – was scheduled for a final ruling by the European Commission in March 2019.[85] If approved, manufacturers of CBD products would be required to conduct safety tests and prove safe consumption, indicating that CBD products would not be eligible for legal commerce until at least 2021.[85]
Research suggests that CBD may exert some of its pharmacological action through its inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which may in turn increase the levels of endocannabinoids, such as anandamide, produced by the body.[7] It has also been speculated that some of the metabolites of CBD have pharmacological effects that contribute to the biological activity of CBD.[38]
Right now, due to arcane laws that are about to change around the world, and strange licensing procedures, cannabis is a supply issue, but that will all change over time.  Cannabis is a plant that can grow in 12 weeks, 16 weeks for some Indica strains.  There will never be a shortage or issue with getting cannabis when it is a plant that can be produced anywhere in the world, in large batches, every 12 weeks.
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Another notable study conducted by Mechoulam was done on mice bred to have a version of type-1 diabetes. The diabetes was designed to manifest right around 14 weeks, so the mice were treated with CBD for the first 7 weeks of their life and then again in another 7 weeks. He concluded that only 30% had developed diabetes compared to the 90-100% given the placebo. 

The genus Cannabis was formerly placed in the nettle (Urticaceae) or mulberry (Moraceae) family, and later, along with the genus Humulus (hops), in a separate family, the hemp family (Cannabaceae sensu stricto).[45] Recent phylogenetic studies based on cpDNA restriction site analysis and gene sequencing strongly suggest that the Cannabaceae sensu stricto arose from within the former family Celtidaceae, and that the two families should be merged to form a single monophyletic family, the Cannabaceae sensu lato.[46][47]

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